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Event Details
Location:
Charlie’s Garden, Redfern
(Gregory Llewellyn, Hartsyard)
Date: Sat 19, Dec
Time: 12pm
View on map
Back
Event Details
Location:
Charlie’s Garden, Redfern
(Gregory Llewellyn, Hartsyard)
Date: Sat 19, Dec
Time: 12pm
View on map

Produce from the garden:

Beetroot, Kale, Silverbeet, Corn, all range of salad greens (Mizuna, Butter Lettuce, Salad Burnett, Mustard Greens, Coral lettuce), Galangal (like ginger), Gotu Kola (asian herb), Calendula, Rosemary, Sage, Lavender, Parsley, Coriander, Beans

Green oil from the garden - Smoked anchovies, potato crisps.
Fresh cheese and onion dip - Nigella seed flatbread, waragel greens, lemon oil.



Tomatoes and plums - Strachiatella, cured pork neck, lemon thyme.
Clams cooked in ash - Corn, parsley, bacon, toasted bread
.



Lamb shoulder - Pickled brassicas seeds, silverbeet, crushed olive, cured tomato.
Peaches and brie - Rosemary spice-cake, wild rice-oat crumble
.



2014 Cake Wines Pinot Noir
James Squire - 'Four Wives' Pilsner


Deb Segal
(Charlies Garden, Gardener)

Produce from the garden:

Beetroot, kale, silverbeet, corn, all range of salad greens (mizuna, butter Lettuce, salad Burnett, mustard greens, coral lettuce), galangal (like ginger), gotu kola (asian herb), calendula, rosemary, sage, lavender, parsley, coriander, beans (many varieties), peas (many varieties), potatoes (also a few varieties), papaya tree + much more!

Tucked away in the quite thorough-fair between Redfern and Eveleigh, Charlies Garden is an jungle-like sanctuary for proactive community gardeners and foragers alike. It's over grown with produce and therein lies it's charm, compost bins, tools, a winding garden pathway. We sat down with Deb, a longtime member to find out a bit more about the garden:

Briefly describe the history of the garden.

The idea for the garden was generated by an inspired group of residents from the Darlington area, as part of the consultation process for the redevelopment of the park (Charles Kernan Reserve)

List the full range of produce that you have grown or that is available.

SO MANY!  Beetroot, Kale, Silverbeet, Corn, all range of salad greens (Mizuna, Butter Lettuce, Salad Burnett, Mustard Greens, Coral lettuce), Galangal (like ginger), Gotu Kola (asian herb), Calendula, Rosemary, Sage, Lavender, Parsley, Coriander, Beans (many varieties), Peas (many varieties), Potatoes (also a few varieties), Papaya tree, White Mulberry, regular Mulberry, Olives, Rhubarb, Yellow Grapefruit, Passionfruit, Spinach, Native spinach, Sorrel, Thyme, Basil, Tomatoes (many varieties), regular and Vietnamese Mint, Kaffir Lime, Bay Tree, zucchini, broccoli, cabbage, broad beans, land cress, and certainly many more!

Is there anything unique about the soil, land, environment that allows you to grow certain things?

We have spent a lot of time improving the soil, ensuring soil microbes are optimally cared for.  This has made a huge difference to quality of produce harvested.  We also add lime, rock dust and 'Rooster Booster' to the beds at regular intervals.

Why do you help out in the garden?

Because the garden not only teaches people the essential skill of growing food, but also helps unite community members and allow for the sharing of stories.  It is relaxing to be in the garden.  Sometimes you will go to the garden and not do that much gardening, but you might meet someone with an interesting story about the area.

 What does the garden mean to the community? And to you?

The garden serves as a source of fresh, organic produce to its community members.  However, it also serves as a source of interest for many passers-by and locals alike.  Children play in the park after school each day, and also come to visit the garden and learn about where food comes from.  

Why do you think community gardens are important?

I think they share a social function in all areas, however I think in urban areas they are particular significant in teaching people about food production.   Increasingly, people have little perception how food they eat is grown, or what is required to grow it, yet consumption increases at a fast pace.  It is vital that everyone can take a moment to slow down (in a community garden) and think about this.

What can people do to help out in the garden or even start one in their own homes...what are your 3 best tips?

 

  1. Every little bit helps - if you are thinking about helping or thinking about starting your own garden, a little bit of work everyday makes the biggest difference.
  2. Soil, Soil, Soil!  This means taking care of soil microbes, as well as having a good relationship with your compost.
  3. Share your understanding. People in community gardens have diverse backgrounds and experiences, everyone and something interesting to share.
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