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Event Details
Location:
St Helen's Garden, Glebe
(Richie Dolan, Chiswick)
Date: Sat 07, Nov
Time: 12pm / 4.30pm
View on map
Back
Event Details
Location:
St Helen's Garden, Glebe
(Richie Dolan, Chiswick)
Date: Sat 07, Nov
Time: 12pm / 4.30pm
View on map

Produce from the garden:

Borage flowers, calendula flowers, nasturtium leaves, chives, garlic chives, lemon, lime balm, lemon grass, marjoram, oregano, mint, apple mint, Vietnamese mint, curry tree leaves, parsley, sage, thyme.

Yellowfin tuna tartare, nashi pear, soy, garden parsley
Radish salad, bitter leaves, grains, confit lemon



Whiskey cured Petuna ocean trout, blood orange, horseradish, crème fraiche
Roast Pork belly, charred corn, mustard, apple
Artichoke salad, Hawkesbury feta, garden greens



Yoghurt panna cotta, Spring berries, olive oil cake



2015 Cake Wines Pinot Gris (The Hills SA)
James Squire - 150 Lashes


Jock Keene
(St Helen's Gardener)

Produce from the garden:

Borage flowers, calendula flowers, nasturtium leaves, flowers chives, garlic chives, lemon, lime balm, lemon grass, marjoram oregano, mint, apple mint, Vietnamese mint, curry tree leaves, parsley, sage, thyme.

There’s something calming about meeting Jock Keene, one of the gardeners and members of St Helen's Community Garden in Glebe. He’s a spirited character, happily showing us around the garden, subtly imparting his wisdom on the soil, this seasons yield and the importance of community. Jock is an absolute representation of why we launched this project, he’s for the people, the community, and some might say, a real catalyst for the success of the garden. We sat down with him for a few minutes and had a chat.

Jock, tell us about the history of the garden?

Finding a piece of land in inner Sydney is the problem. Jan Macindoe and others selected a piece of Council lawn that was unused between the community centre (St Helen’s)_ and the library. St Helen’s garden was started by a letterbox drop of the neighbourhood in May 2012 and about 20 people turned up to the first meeting! We started with 2 beds in 2012 with the rest completed in 2014. We now have nearly 50 members of diverse backgrounds including family groups.

Who are the key members?

We are all equal. This is key to our garden. We do everything communally. Even members who don’t come contribute by their community support for such gardens.

Is there anything unique about the soil, land, environment that allows you to grow certain things?

Building up the nutrients texture of the soil is most essential. We have raised beds and poor quality ‘artificial’ soil was delivered to fill them.

What are some of the challenges you face in keeping the garden thriving?

Sydney’s humidity can causes pests such as aphids, mildew and fruit fly to destroy crops. We are an organic garden.

Why do you think community gardens are important?

Good for both mental and physical health. It is an example of how an activity can cross cultures, age groups, social groups and sexes.

What can people do to help out in the garden or even start one in their own homes...what are your 3 best tips?
    
1. Find a space in the sun (at least 5 hours sun a day).
2. Get or make good soil.
3. Relax and just do it. The phrase “I don’t have a green thumb” is banned.

What are you most looking forward to in regards to the community feast?

Exposing community gardening to a wider audience and showing how it builds community, educates, and is a healthy, relaxing and worthwhile activity that is cheap and easy to be part of. I think the educational role is very important to show children (and adults) how fruit and veggies grow. And the seasonality of vegetables.
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